1973.01.01: Shorts (Red Tide)

Shorts -- Red Tide

Red Tide, Vol. II, No. 4 [Issue #8], January-February 1973

Shorts
[By Michael Letwin]

Hollywood Oath Challenged

The “loyalty oath” at Hollywood High a few months ago has evolved into what could be a positive direction. A committee of the Advisory Council has come out with “Hollywood High School Guidelines for Students.” These are a definite improvement. In the two pages of guidelines, students are urged to familiarize themselves with the more comprehensive statements in “Students Rights and Responsibilities Handbook” and are advised where they can get a copy. These guidelines consist of seven generalized rights (including an assurance that “opinions, concerns, and complaints will be sought, heard and evaluated”) and eight more specific responsibilities. All of these are summarized from the “Students R and R.”

As of now, the procedure will be that students will receive these guidelines in the beginning of the year and will be expected to sign a receipt for them.

Boycott Safeway

The United Farm Workers Union has asked all people to boycott the approx. 2000 (two thousand) stores in the Safeway Supermarket chain that is spread throughout the West. The Farmworkers are asking this because of Safeway’s refusal to buy Farm Workers Union lettuce, and [for buying] lettuce from growers that pay their workers starvation wages, and that maintain horrendously poor working conditions for the families that work for them. So: BOYCOTT ALL SAFEWAYS. DONT BUY LETTUCE UNLESS YOU SEE A UNION LABEL.

R.T. Lawsuit

For the time being, the RED TIDE lawsuits are being recessed, as it is possible that the Board of Education could be revising their rules in regards to distribution of material on campus.

London Students

It has long been the tradition for [British] teachers to discipline school children with canes, straps, belts, rulers, hairbrushes, or their hands. The British were “civilized” enough, however, to provide regulations on such punishments; for example, canes or straps used to hit young people must be a certain specified size. Last spring, thousands students in London took to the streets in protest against caning and other brutal disciplinary procedures. No doubt partly in response to these protests, the London Education Authority outlawed the use of physical punishment in London’s primary schools beginning January 8. The ban only affects young people up to 11 years old, however, and does not apply to children in private or church-aided school, or in schools outside of London.

Teachers in [Britain] are generally opposed to the ban. Terry Casey, general secretary of the National Association of Schoolmasters, told the WALL STREET JOURNAL that when young people act up, “two, or three or four strokes with the cane is quite enough to bring them up with a jolt. A teacher needs to have his authority reinforced.” A former teacher, Hillary Rose, opposed caning: “People aren’t dogs,” she told the reporter.

Pilot Refuses to Kill

“The goals do not justify the mass destruction and killing,” said former B-52 pilot Captain Michael Heck. Heck submitted his resignation to the Air Force after the December bombing raids over Hanoi and Haiphong convinced him he didn’t want to take part in any more U.S. combat operations in the Viet Nam war. According to the Pentagon, four other pilots have also refused to bomb Vietnam since the air operations began more than eight years ago. Heck, however, is the first to come to public attention. Heck stated after his decision, “This is the first time in my life that I have been able to feel really happy and good, because I have made the right decision.” According to the Jan. 22 NEWSWEEK, the Air Force is expected to try for a harsh court-martial sentence against him. “If Heck gets off with a kiss on the cheek,” said one Pentagon official, “he won’t be the last guy who pulls this sort of thing.”

African Leader Murdered

On January 26, about 40 people picketed the Portuguese Consulate in Century City to protest the assassination of Amilcar Cabral, a leader of the PAIGC, the liberation movement that is active in overthrowing the Portuguese tyranny in the African colonies such as Angola, Mozambique, and Guinea-Bissau, where Cabral was killed by Portuguese agents. The pickets also protested the fact that these “little Viet Nams” are paid for by $450 million a year of U.S. taxpayers’ money.

Birth Control Vetoed  

On Dec. 27th, Gov. Reagan vetoed a bill that would have given minors the right to get birth control devices without parental consent. It is the third time that he has vetoed the bill, which would have aided many women in avoiding pregnancy. Reagan said that this bill would help destroy the family.

Farah Pants on Strike

Strikers at Farah Pants plants in Texas and New Mexico have asked shoppers not to buy Farah Pants in solidarity with their strike. This is to help the 2,000 workers win their fight of over 7 months against the company. The strikers are demanding union recognition, higher wages (workers only receive $1.70 an hour) good hospitalization, decent pensions, etc. These pants are sold at May Co. and Bullocks.

[Historical Note: The Red Tide was a revolutionary high school underground newspaper and youth organization that existed from 1971-1981. See: http://theredtide.wordpress.com/%5D

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